Finally, a Great Tasting Low-Carb Bread!

If you’ve followed any of my food exploits you may have heard me mention Laura Dolson of the about.com network.  She runs the Low Carb Diets section, and she’s shared a truly wonderful recipe:

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This recipe makes delicious garlic bread

Foccacia-Style Flax Bread.  Let me tout the wonders of this bread and why I love it:

–It is super easy to make. Mix, pour, bake.
–It holds up to use for sandwiches, grilled cheese, and pizza. And garlic bread. And french toast. And regular toast. And anything you could think of to use sliced bread for. Not very crumbly at all.
–It doesn’t taste like a sponge. Or cardboard. It tastes kinda like a really nutty cornbread. But moister than cornbread and doesn’t fall apart when you pick it up.
–It’s high in fiber! 5 grams per slice.
–The recipe itself is super versatile. You can make savory or sweet, as bread or muffins, etc just by changing what flavors you add to it.
–It’s very low-carb. Literally 1 net carb per slice. Plus 6 grams of protein, so a sandwich has an additional 12 grams of protein in it!
–It’s a great way to eat eggs if you don’t like eggs. Eggs are great protein but… well, I’m not really that fond of them by themselves.

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pizza with flax crust

So a couple things I’ve learned:
–Definitely DO plan on using some spices or flavorings in the recipe. By itself it’s a little bit flax-y. Which is fine if you like that flavor and all. But if you aren’t used to it, then it’s a little weird. So add onion, garlic, paprika, salt, pepper, or Italian or Greek seasoning, or grated parmesan, or anything that strikes you.
–Definitely do use GOLDEN flax seed, not the darker flax. It lightens up the flavor of the bread so that it’s less like canned brown bread or rye bread, and more like a mild cornbread. Unless you like those stronger flavors, of course!
–Make sure the flax you use is finely ground and nowhere near it’s sell-by date, and not in a see-through bag or container when you buy it at the store. Air and light are flax’s worst enemies.
–Store any unused flax in the freezer in a sealed container or ziplock freezer bag, as it has a short shelf life once it’s opened, even in the fridge. If you smell it and it smells fishy at all, then it’s rancid. The oils in the flax go bad easily, so I don’t recommend buying it in bulk from the health food store’s bulk food area because it’s likely rancid already.
–To give your flax a finer texture, you can run the ground flax through a coffee grinder. This makes it almost flour-like.

Have you tried this recipe?  I’d love to hear any variations you have used with this recipe, too.

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